America’s Medical Civil War

The Affordable Care Act has redefined federalism in America by creating new mechanisms for the state and nation to provide healthcare. But those same mechanisms can be weapons of war for future civil strife.

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When Data Becomes Due Process

Prosecutors often use patient data to investigate physicians. But patient data is biased, lacking the robustness required of evidence. And by using data as due process, prosecutors deny physicians their rights.

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COVID Vaccines for Kids

COVID-19 vaccines have been approved for children ages 5-11, a decision most had already anticipated. But lost in the predictability of the policies is critical analysis of data justifying the decisions.

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America United International, Protecting Individuals Against Judicial Misconduct

Dr. Zena Crenshaw-Logal has taken what she learned as an advocate for judicial reform to launch America United International.

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The Media Has Failed Healthcare

The rise in healthcare journalism has led to a rise in biased healthcare articles – with many articles written through inherent biases that are reiterated in subsequent articles.

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First Principles of Healthcare

First principles thinking attempts to break down complex concepts into its fundamental parts. When we apply this thinking to healthcare, we find it to be chaotic and dialectic.

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Moderna, a Modern Medical Company

Moderna’s decision to restrict the licensing rights of its vaccine came as a surprise to many. But for those who understand the modern healthcare system, the decision was expected.

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The DEA’s Long Game

The DEA recently issued a public health alert, warning of counterfeit pills. A seemingly odd alert given the DEA’s restrictions on prescription opioids, until you understand its purpose.

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Vaccine or Treatment

The public perceives the pandemic through binary thinking, as though playing a zero sum game. But healthcare is not binary. And to overcome this mindset, we should change the rules of the game.

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Abortion’s Precedent

America’s regulation of abortion sets a concerning precedent for all of healthcare. As we expand healthcare coverage, we must caution against excessive regulations of other medical conditions.

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What ‘Doing Research’ Really Means

A phrase we hear frequently of late, often among prominent personalities with little to no formal scientific training. We decode what they mean.

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Mixing and Matching Vaccines

The CDC might reverse course again, this time on mixing vaccine formularies. We review the science and politics underlying the decision.

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Modern Day Fertility Crisis

A recent report erroneously attributes decreasing fertility rates to personal choice among women, conflating economic trends with personal decisions.

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Crafting a Vaccine Marketing Campaign

We see many newly minted vaccine campaigns motivating those eligible to get vaccinated. We analyze why these campaigns will fail.

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Healthcare Equity in Medical Education

The AAMC launched an initiative encouraging medical schools to study healthcare equity – a laudable goal, but one that can go wrong.

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End of Year Healthcare IPO Bubble

Many highly valued healthcare startups are struggling as public companies, leading many to believe a healthcare bubble is on the horizon.

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Card Stacking COVID-19 Boosters

The FDA approved a booster dose for COVID-19 vaccines. A sensible decision, but we are concerned at how they derived it.

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Curious Case of Rising Death Rates

A report by NBER reveals stark disparities in American mortality, which may redefine how we see healthcare.

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Art of the Startup

The perceptions of healthcare entrepreneurship differ from its realities. This is why many healthcare startups fail.

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America’s Abortion Obsession

The United States has a long history of restricting abortions, using the pretense of medicine to enact laws that moralize a medical procedure.

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Why Healthcare Laws are Restrictive

Healthcare laws restrict specific aspects of healthcare behavior. But in restricting, they reduce complex behavior into simplified restrictions.

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Israeli Data, American Policy

Israel has become an international leader in COVID-19 research. But we should question whether we can apply Israeli data into American policy.

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Afghan Shock on Healthcare

The war on drugs has become an international battle, with foreign policy affecting healthcare domestically. The recent events in Afghanistan show how closely they link.

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Influenza and COVID-19

Fall has yet to arrive, but already we hear warnings of a combined viral outbreak of influenza and COVID, despite the data. We parse through the conjecture to discern the facts.

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Co-opting Price Transparency

Originally designed to empower patients, price transparency has transformed into a legal liability, becoming a documentation burden for healthcare institutions.

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Why Scientists Lie

There is a fine line between a lie and trying to simplify complex scientific topics. A subtle difference that forms a divide between what scientists say and what the public hears.

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Of Approvals and Mandates

A COVID-19 vaccine received full FDA approval, prompting calls for vaccine mandates. But when patients act as consumers, regulatory approval hardly affects the decision to get vaccinated.

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Data & Individuals

Healthcare is immersed in data, which now define all aspects of clinical care. But data do not define the individual, just like symptoms of a disease do not define the patient.

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Science, Politics & Ethics of Boosters

We recently approved booster shots for the COVID-19 vaccine, raising many issues across different fronts, all defined by one core premise.

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Does COVID-19 Mutate Rapidly?

The pandemic lingers on, defined by the viral variants of COVID-19. We explore the mutation patterns to determine whether the end is near.

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Physician Advocacy Rings Hollow

Physician leaders call for advocacy, galvanizing the medical community to take up public health issues. But these calls appear hollow, more bluster than action.

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Are Politicians Beholden to ‘Do No Harm’?

Political rhetoric on public health policy is now affecting individual patient decisions. Should politicians be held liable for the clinical consequences?

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Empowering Police Clinically

Law enforcement often makes rapid decisions in high pressure situations – not unlike physicians. Perhaps law enforcement should train more like clinicians.

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The Healthcare Jungle

Corporate medicine has changed the once autonomous physician profession into a traditional labor workforce, eliminating the art of medicine.

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Trumpism, Post-Pandemic

Individualism has long defined America, but over the country’s history, it has appeared differently – the current version being both cynical and destructive.

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America’s Failing Healthcare

America’s healthcare system has yet again underperformed when compared with other nations, revealing systemic shortcomings that can be fixed with a shift in perception.

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The Despair Epidemic

We define the current mental health crisis through outcomes like mortality. But to truly address and fix this crisis, we must change how we perceive mental health.

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Influence of VC on Healthcare R&D

Venture capital has made its presence known in healthcare. What remains to be seen is how venture capital will affect traditional research and development in healthcare.

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Perceptions Over Outcomes

COVID-19 showed that outcomes cannot represent the full scope of patient behavior. More than outcomes, the perceptions patients hold determine the true intent behind their actions.

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When Uncertainty is the Data

Once again, the CDC has revised its stance on masks, prompting a barrage of compliments and critiques. But the announcement was prompted not by data, rather by its absence.

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Predicting COVID-19’s Fall Upswing

The alarm bells have rung, and the alarmists have spoken. COVID-19 is in resurgence. But to predict what this means – an aberration or a real trend – we should study the uncertainty.

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Modeling Patient Irrationality

Healthcare insurance models forecast behavior by assuming patients are rational and make decisions optimally – two persisting errors, proving the models to be outdated.

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Of Medicine and Law

Two unique fields, each distinct on its own, yet inextricably linked through a set of words – rights and liberty – such that the interpretation of the words defines the relationship.

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Revising the Opioid Guidelines

Nuance, a word often cited in discussions regarding the CDC opioid prescribing guidelines. But in citing nuance, they really mean complex – revealing an unresolved disconnect between thought and action.

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Paths of Understanding

The CDC has defined the process through which it will revise the opioid prescribing guidelines. One that includes public commentary as well as in-depth private conversations, creating different paths of understanding.

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Transparency by Proxy

The committee working with the committee revising the CDC opioid prescribing guidelines met in a public assembly, highlighting a contrast in transparency among those providing recommendations, and those doing the revisions.

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Pfizer’s Moral Hazard

Pfizer recently announced the possibility of a third dose, a booster dose, for the COVID-19 vaccine. An announcement met with uncertainty – from policy experts to the general public – exposing a potential moral hazard for Pfizer.

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Abundance of Ignorance

Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink – a famous line from a famous poem contrasting the abundance of water with its quality. An analogy apt for healthcare in which we find an abundance of data, but little understanding of it.

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Rural Healthcare

Rural health is all the rage these days, with opportunities abound for a previously neglected patient population. But as healthcare pivots towards the rural, it will realize a key distinction that defines this population.

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Freedom of Misinformation

Freedom means many things to many people. Above all, the freedom to disagree. But when disagreements occur not just between opinions, but between facts, the freedom of information we so proudly protect dissolves into a freedom of misinformation.

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COVID-19 Delta Surges

The final days of the pandemic may feel like a prolonged good-bye, but for regions facing local surges in viral incidence, the pandemic is anything but a distant memory. And like all memories, prone to simplifications, like most pandemic narratives.

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Rise of Physician Advocates

Patient advocacy permeates all aspects of healthcare, including regulatory processes. But lacking in the newfound emphasis on patient input is the role of physicians in the patient experience, leading to a lack of physicians in regulatory processes.

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Post-Pandemic Opioid Litigation

As Mark Twain said, history does not repeat itself, but it often rhymes. As the current wave of opioid litigation is eerily similar to what we have seen before – but with one critical difference – which may make all the difference.

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Healthcare Hybridization

Healthcare never advances along a simple course, it is always a convoluted mix of what is predicted and unanticipated – a hybrid. And to predict healthcare, we should focus less on what might happen, and more on how such hybrids form.

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Healthcare Consumerism

Population health has never been more in demand, with hospitals unveiling many new care models. But rather than the care offered, the perception of patient decision-making is more important – seeing patients as consumers.

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A Medical Decision, Made Legally

With the CDC’s abrupt decision to lift all mask mandates, businesses were left to decide whether to maintain the mandates. A decision most chose to uphold, a decision made legally in the face of medical uncertainty.

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What is Data, Really?

The FDA recently approved a drug touted to treat Alzheimer’s Disease. A decision decried by policy experts as data supporting the drug focused less on symptoms of the disease, and more on imaging studies of patients with the disease.

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Trust and Distrust

Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive among patients, even among those who opt to receive it. Yet physicians continue to denounce the hesitancy as unfounded distrust. Instead, we must acknowledge the distrust, to foster trust in the vaccine.

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Of Systems and Attributions

Of all the issues plaguing healthcare, none is more pressing than our inability to see healthcare as a complex system. As a result, we attribute fault to individuals for problems that are fundamentally systemic.

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Healthcare is Irrational

One Medical acquired Iora Health, a surprising integration of two vastly different companies that does not make sense at first glance, until we identify the driver of value creation in healthcare.

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Medical Devices & Patient Advocacy

If perception is reality, then the changing perception of post-pandemic healthcare has ushered in a new reality for the medical device industry. One in which patient advocacy is as essential as therapeutic efficiency.

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Disparity Masquerading As Equity

There is much talk about healthcare equity, and the importance of access in healthcare. But access means different things to different patients, and what is believed to be equity is often a disparity.

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The Fault In Our Letters

The WHO has introduced nomenclature redefining COVID-19 variants to prevent prejudices formed during the pandemic. But a close examination reveals this prejudice to be systemic throughout healthcare.

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Vaccine Diplomacy

The great game is now upon us, with the United States entering the fray of international vaccine diplomacy, doling vaccines to countries in need and to countries of geopolitical importance.

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The Pandemic Can Solve Healthcare’s Problems

To find meaning in suffering is to transcend it. Something we can do in healthcare now that the pandemic seems mostly behind us. But to find such meaning, we must address foundational issues facing healthcare, issues that may not have caused the pandemic, but were exposed by it.

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Brave New World

America is the land of optimism, with an undeniable taste for dystopian futures. One which pits technological advancements in medicine against personal liberties. A belief more pervasive and systemic than we think, extending well beyond the conspiratorial fringes of society.

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Medium is the Message

Today Dr. Deborah Birx is known for many things. But earlier she was known as the country’s leading voice for AIDS, and other stigmatizing infectious diseases. We follow her voice through the pandemic, deciphering how her words affected what we believed then, and what we believe now.

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Healthcare is Woke

Healthcare is now fully engaged in many of the social justice issues grappling the country. A move generally seen to be positive, essential in addressing many of the existing healthcare inequities. But the increasing politicization of healthcare may be more of a mix bag than we realize.

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CDC About Face

The CDC issued a recent revision to the mask mandate, lifting many of the preexisting requirements. A move met with a range of different reactions, revealing a growing trend of Federalism in healthcare, in which local and state governments now exercise a distinct level of autonomy.

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Databases for Healthcare Uncertainty

Data drives healthcare, whether it is individual decisions or broader health policies. But data only tells us what we know, or presume to know. Studying the uncertainty around data, in much the same way we study data, would reveal gaps in our knowledge, helping to better understand the data itself.

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Healthcare Data as Healthcare Inequity

We can now see how post-pandemic healthcare will look. Data platforms will grow in sophistication alongside a growing distrust in data, perpetuating a disparity – a dichotomy of data – forming a new type of healthcare inequity.

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A Letter to the Attorney General

We pen a letter requesting a civil rights investigation into violations of private liberties among those disenfranchised by a healthcare system in which the fear of prosecution defines the quality of patient care.

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What’s in a Number?

We present a story about two federal agents analyzing prescription data and trying to make sense of what they see – to determine if what they see is criminal. But differing perceptions lead to different interpretations of the data.

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What the Indian COVID-19 Crisis Teaches Us – About Ourselves

The country has united in support of India. A unity nowhere to be found during our own COVID-19 crisis, revealing a critical contradiction in America that defines our society, and our ability to address healthcare inequity.

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Medical Error vs. Personal Liberty

Any upgrade can be justified through the pretense of healing. It is a matter of perspective. Just like medical errors can be reinterpreted to be infringing upon one’s personal liberties. It is a matter of legal interpretation.

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Law of Patient Experience

Most healthcare laws claim to be logical, but healthcare is more experience than logic. Healthcare laws should then be defined by the patient experience – as it is experienced – not through implicitly assumed patient behavior.

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Pattern or Practice, Patient or Suspect

We request a pattern-or-practice investigation studying how law enforcement differentiates patients with dependencies from suspects with criminal intent.

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Healthcare Natural Rights

We call upon civil rights organizations and champions of civil liberties to codify healthcare natural rights for the modern era of complex healthcare.

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Substantive Due Process in Healthcare

We ask the federal courts to update and expand upon the definition of substantive due process as it pertains to healthcare rights.

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Prospecting for Vaccine Complications

Recently the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was placed on hold. We studied data to compare the risk of blood clots with the risk of vaccine availability. But instead of data, we should study our perceptions, particularly our perception of low probability events.

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Common Law & Common Sense

We have healthcare laws that we do not follow. We have healthcare policies that we actively flout. The disparity between healthcare law & policy, and patient behavior warrants an examination of our common law origins to understand how to fix these disparities.

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Financial Determinants of Health

Patient behavior follows the path of least resistance, as patients are more compliant when they face fewer hurdles in their care. Something codified recently into formal policy when the American Diabetes Association emphasized the ability to pay in the treatment of diabetes.

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A Doctor Takes the Stand

Derek Chauvin is on trial for the death of George Floyd, and the whole world is watching. In the midst of the legal proceedings, a physician took the stand and epitomized the principles of medical jurisprudence for the world to see.

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Patterns of Association

Expert and novice. Physician and patient. The presumed dichotomy between those deemed experts or knowledgeable, compared to those deemed novices or lacking in knowledge is more perception than reality – as what truly separates the two are patterns of association.

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Ode to Civics

In honor of National Poetry Month, we share a prose-poem dedicated to a region of America that has been decimated first by the opioid epidemic and now by the COVID-19 pandemic, reminding ourselves that what makes us great is the ability to be good to one another.

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Gain of Function in Wuhan

The World Health Organization released its initial report on the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic – and in the process, released a Pandora’s box of speculation. While we may never know the true origins of the virus, we speculate on the most likely cause, which may stem from the most probable type of mutation.

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COVID’s K-Shaped Recovery

While most project an optimistic outlook for economic recovery post-pandemic, we find it to be fundamentally disjointed, revealing structural economic changes. These changes are defined by a new trend of healthcare consumerism, in which public health risk dominates basic economic decision-making.

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Healthcare Innovation is Evolutionary

The pandemic may have put an end to many things, but it only accelerated early stage funding into healthcare startups. While the exorbitant increase in funding may appear promising, it does not define success. Rather than the funding, adapting to changes in the regulatory landscape defines success for startups.

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Mens Rea & Dr. Gokal

A Houston physician finds himself facing the ire of the law after he administered vaccines to acquaintances not scheduled to receive it. But do his actions truly constitute a crime? We explore the common law origins of the modern concept of crime, and determine whether it is possible to prove criminal intent in this case.

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The Importance of Credibility

Rule of law demands equal treatment under the law. Yet when physicians are accused of crimes, rule of law often descends into mob rule. As both prosecutors and defendants fight in the court of public opinion to influence the outcome in the court of law, prioritizing the tyranny of majority over the morality of law.

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When Economy Becomes Biology

Under the new COVID-19 relief package, the federal government provides long overdue support for those suffering in the midst of a pandemic, while expanding healthcare to unprecedented levels. Though beneficial in the short term, the long term effects of expansion may prove counterintuitive and worsen patient care.

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What Happened to COVID-19 Testing?

In recent weeks COVID-19 testing has reduced significantly, which many attribute to the rise in vaccinations. But positivity rates are measured by testing for COVID-19, and if we decrease the number of tests performed, then we diminish our ability to trace positivity rates, delaying a response against a fourth wave.

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Patient Cyber Narratives

Healthcare will become more decentralized and populist post-pandemic. With patients relying upon digital and internet-based tools to seek medical care and to learn about their medical conditions. As patients experience healthcare differently, the basic patient narrative will change as well, becoming more internet-driven.

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Taxing Healthcare Behavior

If we have learned anything from the pandemic, it is that healthcare is linked to all aspects of society, and that our individual actions have overarching, collective consequences. Should we then impose a tax upon those who behave in medically harmful ways, given that those individual actions affect us all?

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The Pandemic May End Soon – That’s the Problem

With the pandemic ending, we are beginning to predict the future of healthcare and society. But the future never follows a rational, predictable trajectory. It advances in unique, unpredictable ways – often at the cost of society’s most vulnerable.

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Pandemic’s Ecological Fallacy

The pandemic ushered in clinical studies that have changed healthcare policy. But the pace of publications also led to studies with questionable evidence and notable retractions, warranting a review of how we apply broad data to individual decision-making.

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War Elephants of Healthcare

The original battle tanks of antiquity, war elephants were famed for the terror they inflicted on the battlefield. And equally famed for falling apart once faced with uncertainty. Not unlike many of the perceived truths we take for granted in healthcare.

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Anatomy of a DEA Investigation

As the opioid epidemic rages on, DEA agents and local law enforcement intensify their efforts to curtail the diversion of prescription medications. But how are they going about their investigations of healthcare providers?

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Medical Devices are for the Startups

Most new medical devices are designed and developed by startups, only to be acquired by larger medical device corporations when the new device is ready for sales. A tried and true approach to innovation that is ripe for disruption.

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Nonlinear Healthcare Models

For most businesses, the relationship between revenue and cost is defined in a straightforward unit economic model. In healthcare, this model is anything but straightforward, as the more accurately we define healthcare, the more complicated it becomes.

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When Reddit Comes For Healthcare

We all know the impact Reddit has on the financial world. But how will Reddit’s impact appear in the medical world? There are many factors that predict how a similar movement across Reddit’s healthcare platforms would look.

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There’s a Vaccine For That

The COVIDization of healthcare will usher in new trends in healthcare, the most promising of which is the widespread use of vaccines to treat a range of medical conditions, advancing the trend towards customized treatment.

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Rise of the Medical Licensing Boards

Mostly used to oversee licensing and disciplinary issues, each state’s board holds a unique relationship with the state’s attorney general’s office, and can provide medical context for healthcare legal policies.

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A New Approach to the Opioid Epidemic

The opioid epidemic is defined through statistics, which has influenced our approach to resolving it – with little success. We should now change our approach and look at the epidemic as a sequence of decisions.

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The Pandemic is a Perception

Healthcare data has proven to be of little value to both policy makers and to the public. Instead of data, we should monitor subjective metrics like fear and resiliency to predict the course of the pandemic.

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Healthcare is a System

An obvious statement that most would agree with. Yet few understand systemic thinking in healthcare, which requires an understanding of the complex patterns of behavior that define interactions in healthcare.

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COVID-19’s ‘Miracle’ Drugs

Another day, another miracle drug. Or so it seems. As seemingly every day we hear about new drugs touted as the next miracle, only to be shelved after a few weeks. We explore this trend, and examine the popularity of the drugs used to treat COVID-19 patients.

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Vaccines Versus Variants

The latest pandemic narrative pits the newly discovered, highly infectious COVID-19 variants against the efforts to vaccinate as many people as possible. But this conflates two largely disparate aspects of the pandemic, and skews our perceptions of future successes.

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Prospect Theory in Healthcare

Healthcare is irrational and patients behave irrationally. Yet we continue to develop healthcare models assuming that patients are rational. Behavioral economists have already devised models to adjust for irrationality, which healthcare needs to incorporate.

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Echo Chambers in Healthcare

Our senses are our world. So what we perceive is what we believe. With the perceptions gleaned during a patient encounter determining the healthcare beliefs we hold. We analyze how perceptions form to see how they diverge in healthcare.

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Familiarity Biases

History may not repeat itself, but it does rhyme. And the tendency to seek the familiar out of the new creates a familiarity bias. That when applied to healthcare leaves us flat-footed when addressing new problems, diseases, and trends.

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Obesity is Complicated

Obesity is a complex medical condition treated through both behavioral changes and medical intervention. But to truly help patients cope with the disease, we have to understand how patients perceive their relationship with food.

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COVID-19’s Honor System

The vaccine roll-out has been predictably unpredictable, with chaos now the norm. With all the uncertainty around when many will receive the vaccine, the system has largely come to depend upon people responding honestly about their eligibility.

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J&J COVID-19 Go-To-Market Strategy

Market entry may be a sprint, but market dominance is a marathon. And those who end up winning the market are those who best understand the market. J&J may not have the best vaccine, but they have the best understanding of the market.

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Persistent Racial Biases

The fault is not in our stars, but in ourselves. In the subtle, implicit biases we continue to carry across many healthcare interactions. What may initially appear as a slight shift in perception, once repeated, soon magnifies into significant disparities.

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Did The Pandemic Improve After Inauguration?

If perception is reality, then does the perception that the pandemic will improve under Biden create the reality that the pandemic is now under control? We examine what changed with the new administration to determine what is real and what is perception.

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Healthcare Is A (Positive) Right

The pandemic has shown that public health and individual rights have an uneasy relationship. But this does not have to be so. We evaluate the concept of rights to determine the optimal relationship between the two.

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Healthcare Trends

Financial traders will tell you that market trends are more powerful than any one trading strategy. Similarly in healthcare, we find broad healthcare trends to be more impactful than any one clinical behavior for a patient’s overall health.

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The Future of Healthcare Law

COVID-19 has changed much about healthcare. Its greatest change may come in how we structure and interpret healthcare law. We study the history of healthcare law to better understand the future of healthcare laws that balance individual rights with public health.

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Intellectual Burdens In Healthcare

Liberty is the foundation of American culture. But liberty in healthcare often handicaps patients who are less educated about their health. Creating a paradox in which added liberties produce intellectual burdens among those most vulnerable.

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Eliminating the X Factor

The Department of Health and Human Services has eliminated the X-waiver requirement for physicians who prescribe opioid addiction medicine. We study the Government’s role during the vaping epidemic to understand the likely consequences of this decision.

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How Healthcare Gets Extreme

Healthcare is a balance, weighing different causes and effects, like an internal opportunity cost. But when the law simplifies the complexity of medicine, a disparity forms between healthcare and law creating extreme legal interpretations devoid of clinical context. A pattern we may see in the upcoming pandemic litigation.

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The Vaccine Is Not The Savior We Believe – But That Is Okay

The vaccine has arrived and the roll-out has begun, with many of the high-risk already vaccinated. But we should remain cautious, for what will bring an end to the pandemic is not the vaccine, but consistently maintaining the social distancing parameters, despite the perception that the worst is over.

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Can India Do The Impossible?

Within days India will begin one of the largest vaccine roll-outs in the world. Despite the enormous challenges that lie ahead, there are many reasons to believe India can pull it off. And if successful, India may prove to be an ideal case study for other nations to emulate.

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Special Report: Amicus Curiae Brief (USA v. Walmart Inc.)

Healthcare litigation surrounding the opioid epidemic has led to a slew of high-profile legal cases – with implications extending throughout healthcare. Yet regulatory policies arising from these cases run contrary to principles of good patient care – creating more harm than good. Out of concern for patients unduly affected, we wrote an amicus curiae brief for the latest civil action taken against Walmart by the Department of Justice.

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Experiencing COVID-19 Firsthand

While most of the world was relaxing over the holidays, we at Daily Remedy were struggling with COVID-19. And we soon learned that reporting on COVID-19 is far different than experiencing the disease firsthand.

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Has COVID-19 Made Us Smarter?

Living through a pandemic has undoubtedly made us more aware of our health and healthcare policy. But as we struggle to find meaning through it all, we must ask – has the experience made us more intelligent as patients?

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The Vaccine is Here

The vaccine is here – and everything seems to be going wrong. We discuss some of the obstacles encountered and identify the root cause underlying the mistakes that transpired and the inevitable mistakes to come in the future.

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COVID-19’s Mental Constraints

The pandemic has proven how complex the relationship between healthcare policy and economics can be. However, the mental constraints may be more impactful than the economic constraints. And to study the full impact of COVID-19, we should develop new ways to study COVID-19’s mental constraints.

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Mindfulness in Medical Decisions

Healthcare is a series of decisions, one after another. But most decisions are made reflexively, reiterating familiar patterns of thought. Being mindful of each decision optimizes overall decision-making, knowing when to rely on reflex judgments and when to deliberate further.

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Water, Water Everywhere

The editors write a heartfelt note thanking the readers for their support of the healthcare content and for their participation in the monthly surveys.

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Do the Previously Infected Need a Vaccine?

The vaccine roll-out is well on its way, and already the early rifts are starting to form. But the ensuing ethical debates have yet to manifest. Among them is the question of whether those previously infected need to take the vaccine. A question many remain silent on for now – which will change once the vaccines become available.

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Telemedicine and Trust

Telemedicine may be the future of healthcare. Exactly how that future will manifest varies widely. But predicting the future based upon the present will lead to incorrect predictions. So rather than follow the technology, we follow the patterns of trust among patients and the public to predict the future of telemedicine.

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Microfinance in Modern Healthcare

Microfinance has changed the world for good, helping millions support their healthcare costs. But the future of modern healthcare depends less on the financial aspects of microfinance, and more on the sense of commitment and community – the non-financial aspects – to improve patient outcomes.

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When Will COVID-19 Functionally End?

The year 2020 is finally coming to an end, but the end of the pandemic seems nowhere in sight. While COVID-19 may never be truly eliminated, we might be able to control the virus well enough to return to normalcy at some point in 2021 – assuming certain variables fall in our favor.

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When Healthcare Law and Ethics Conflict

Most assume law to be a reflection of the ethics within a society. But in healthcare, law and ethics are often conflicting, putting healthcare providers in difficult situations, compromising patient care to follow the law. But is a law really a law if it violates the ethics of patient care?

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The Pace of Healthcare

All things move at their own pace. A statement more likely to be made by a philosopher than by a healthcare policy expert. But healthcare works best when it works at a specific pace, with the optimal cadence maximizing progress while minimizing risk, both real and perceived, expected and unforeseen.

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Vaccine True Efficacy

The pandemic has accelerated the adoption of consumerism principles throughout healthcare. But not everybody is adopting these principles uniformly. And the differences may affect vaccine distribution and adoption, prolonging the pandemic. But a start-up based approach of introducing the vaccine may help discover these differences earlier and improve long term adoption.

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COVID-19 & The Future of Online News

The recent lockdowns and ongoing restrictions have brought about an increased interest in health and science news online. But a closer analysis underlying the increased readership reveals unique behaviors and trust preferences among those reading such articles – behaviors and preferences that may go on to predict the future of news consumption online.

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Quantum Healthcare

Quantum mechanics has been applied to many fields of science, including biology, leading to recent breakthroughs among longstanding problems within the field. Applying these principles in healthcare can similarly lead to profound shifts in how we approach healthcare and improve upon many problems seen in clinical practice – including our inability to handle conflicting patient information.

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Marketing Virality

A hospital executive struggles to balance the accurate reporting of viral incidence rates with the business needs of his hospital – and soon finds himself balancing the ethics of medicine with the ethics of healthcare marketing.

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Great Expectations

Bob the pharmacist prides himself on his dedication to his patients, and his commitment to his job. But when he feels corporate pressure to measure and document every task done, he begins to lose his sense of pride.

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Patient Schematics

For many physicians, their patients come to symbolize many things. For this particular physician, the patients appear as different symbols – with each symbol representing a special relationship with each patient.

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A Vaccine Mandate By Any Other Name

A rose by any other name would smell just as sweet. And a vaccine mandate by any other name would be just as resisted. As we come closer to a publicly available vaccine, we come closer to the inevitable collision between the public perception of the vaccine, and the government efforts to increase participation in taking the vaccine. While the government has promised not to impose mandates in the traditional sense, there are signs that the government will try to influence public participation by offering financial incentives. We caution against this, and hope the government works to increase participation by building confidence instead – starting by surveying the public and quantifying confidence across different communities through a vaccine confidence index.

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Improving Healthcare By Minimizing Substitution Costs

Healthcare is set to change in novel, unprecedented ways in the years to come. But how we envision these changes is as important as what we seek to change – particularly when it comes to socializing healthcare under a one-payer model. Whether competition is good or bad for patients is not the issue. Rather, we should frame the debate around aspects of competition that are good for patients, by studying the substitution costs patients incur in their local healthcare markets. Optimizing the substitution costs per patient will define competitive behaviors that are beneficial for patients, and define the optimal mix of payers and providers within each local healthcare market.

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Waiting

A mesmerizing short story about a family reminiscing over a loved one as they wait patiently, and at times impatiently, in the surgical waiting room. We follow three family members – Betty, Leroy, and Melody – as they each cope with the angst of waiting while their beloved Jonathan undergoes a life altering surgery.

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Can Walmart Help Solve the Opioid Epidemic?

To stave off a pending criminal investigation, Walmart has filed civil action against the Department of Justice requesting clarification on the interpretation of the Controlled Substance Act. A law notorious for its lax interpretations that seems to change in every legal proceeding. But in seeking clarification, this case has the potential to establish a consistent framework for jurisprudence that – if developed properly – can find a balance between individual patient rights and the common good.

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Modeling the Dissemination of Opioid Settlement Funds

Legal settlements are known for quantifying medical burdens through static economic models, a problem the federal government acknowledges underrepresents the full scope of medical harm to individual patients. We propose a unique model that disseminates funds to patients based upon the relative burdens the epidemic has inflicted in each community. A model that represents the full, but disproportional extent of harm among communities across the country.

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Healthcare Has A ‘Clear & Present Danger’ Problem

State medical licensing boards have become more proactive than ever in overseeing physician behavior and enforcing punishments. But the legal tactics often used are based upon antiquated, misapplied statutes that have been overused to the point of being superfluous. This is most apparent in the ‘clear and present’ phrase used in nearly every punitive measure against physicians. But where did this phrase come from? And what are the consequences of its overuse – and certain abuse – on physicians?

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Implicit Healthcare Nudges

Nudges have recently grown in popularity within healthcare as the field continues to integrate principles of behavioral economics. But nudges have proven to be inconsistently effective, and at times even a nuisance, limiting the overall effectiveness of nudges to date – even leading some to discredit the value of nudges in healthcare altogether. But nudges do indeed hold value, though the value of the nudges resides in how the nudges are constructed – as effectively designed nudges target implicit behaviors instead of the explicit prompts that we have traditionally seen.

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Legal Fluency v. Patient Rights

Beneath all the headline grabbing criminal cases, lawsuits, and settlements that epitomize healthcare litigation lies a more fundamental legal battle – the legal fluency arising from aggregated, templated legal arguments versus the disenfranchised patient with unique, individualized medical needs. A battle that will define the lasting implications of healthcare litigation – determining whether the legal strategies used to win court cases truly reflect the patients represented in the cases.

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Defining Medically Appropriate

A term often used, but poorly defined – yet subject readily to manipulative, self-serving interpretations. Generally assumed to be behavior consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, medically appropriate is the reference standard that we all agree to – in principle – yet when we apply it in practice we find widely disparate meanings. We attempt to understand the term from the evolving history of government responses to observe how changing dynamics over time can predict changing interpretations of the term in the future.

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Trumpism Lives on in Healthcare

The elections may be over, and the current administration is likely on its way out, but the core ideals of Trumpism will live on, influencing the events of 2021 – particularly the healthcare policies of 2021. But now that Trumpism is no longer the political belief holding power, how will those beliefs impact a cohesive COVID-19 response? French historian Alexis de Tocqueville warned Americans about the ‘tyranny of the majority’, providing eerily prescient insights that can help to understand the evolution of Trumpism, and accordingly, help to prepare a unified approach to COVID-19.

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Success In The Age of COVID-19

Hope springs eternal as we transition into a new administration with a new, and hopefully more scientific approach to the COVID-19 pandemic. With promises of new interventions, mandates, and vaccines, we have every reason to feel confident in the upcoming administration’s success. But what is success in the age of COVID-19? What constitutes objective success when the parameters are fundamentally subjective? We believe success is a ratio of subjective metrics referenced against one another, providing an objective frame of reference across different populations.

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Gaming Therapy

DEA Agents Martin and Jennings find themselves in the middle of another physician investigation, analyzing data to determine what they can charge this latest physician with. But Jennings soon comes to realize that healthcare has particular attributes that make it more complicated, and quite different, from the traditional drug deals he was trained to analyze. Attributes that define cooperation and non-cooperation through the decision-making between patient and physician. Attributes, that when studied closely, redefine criminality in the clinical setting.

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A Framework For Medical Jurisprudence

Underlying all the political rancor of late is a pending matter that will have monumental implications on healthcare. The Supreme Court is set to rule on the Constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. But what determines Constitutionality for a field of legal interpretation, medical jurisprudence, that has been neglected for decades? How will the Justices analyze healthcare law when no recently developed frameworks exist through which we can analyze such laws?

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The Heuristics In Our Medical Decisions

The study of medical decision-making is woefully underdeveloped relative to other fields of decision-making, such as quantitative finance and criminal sociology. But to better study trends in healthcare behavior, we must extrapolate behaviors seen in other disciplines to glean potential similarities – and improve our understanding of healthcare behavior. How do day trading skills relate to vaping mortality? How do the false attributions along the crime curve relate to prescribing patterns?

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Trust Is Inherent To Healthcare

Trust is an essential aspect of healthcare – and without trust, healthcare breaks down into a series of facts, data points, and guidelines. But as legislators and policy makers weigh the future of healthcare, they should keenly note that healthcare cannot be adjudicated without trust – and to separate trust from healthcare would be to violate the natural rights of those practicing the art of medicine.

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There Is A Doctor On The Ballot

To celebrate Election Day, Daily Remedy unveils a short story about a physician entering the world of politics. Dr. Kapoor, a bright, young physician, decides to leave a promising career as a physician to enter politics in his native Iowa. While campaigning, he encounters a senior political journalist who seems baffled and then incredulous that a young physician would turn away a career of clinical medicine for a life of politics.

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Narratives – The Future of Healthcare

In today’s healthcare, technology and data reign supreme. But as we move forward, first through and then beyond the COVID-19 pandemic, we will realize that the future of healthcare is defined by patient narratives. Narratives built upon implicit patient biases that determine everyday decisions. And over the course of time, the narrative the patient tells navigates the course of behavior – and when taken in aggregate, navigates the future of healthcare.

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Predicting the Election by Anticipating Voter Behavior

The election is only days away and the uncertainty has never been greater. Politics has never been as polarizing and a major COVID-19 upsurge has never seemed as imminent. Pundits across the political spectrum have postulated how all these factors will influence the overall election. But we predict the election will hinge less on the political dynamics, and more on individual heuristics, or thought patterns that influence behavior. We believe COVID-19 will influence Democratic voter behavior disproportionately more than Republican voter behavior – making a Trump victory far more likely than the polls would indicate.

NOTE: Daily Remedy takes pride in its journalistic integrity and political objectivity. We do not endorse any candidate nor any political party, and all perspectives are derived from internal research and data analysis.

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Virtue In Healthcare

Healthcare is founded on the principles of virtue. In the Oath of Hippocrates, healthcare is defined as an art to be practiced with dedication and love – attributes all physicians aspire to attain. More modern interpretations of healthcare attempt to define the role of virtue in patient care through straightforward guidelines and statutes. But we should see virtue as a complex characteristic rather than a simple metric.

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Perception & Corruption – Healthcare in Today’s Prisons

One of the hallmarks of modern healthcare is the emphasis on documentation. But anything that is emphasized is inevitably over-emphasized – and the accentuated importance placed upon documentation has distorted healthcare to the point that it has become defined by documentation. No where is this more evident than in federal prisons across the country – where healthcare is less about health and more about careful documentation.

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Impending Militarization of COVID-19

The COVID-19 vaccine is now only weeks away from being available. But having a vaccine ready and having access are two different things, as the administration and distribution of the vaccine will be overseen by the military – through a program called Operation Warp Speed, a collaboration between the Department of Defense and the Department of Health and Human Services. But is the American public ready for the impending militarization of COVID-19 in the coming months?

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Undue Burdens of Healthcare Law

Healthcare laws attempt to adjudicate complex patient behaviors into standardized statutes. But in simplifying fundamentally complex concepts into standards, we inevitably find errors of approximation – that manifest as undue burdens upon select patient populations.

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Complexity Will Define the Future of Healthcare

We live in an increasingly complex world – defined by the principles of complexity which emphasize interactions and feedback loops within a constantly changing system. Principles that have revolutionized most industries across the world, but curiously has not entered into the world of healthcare. But those who can master complexity in healthcare will determine its future.

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The Psychology of Time

Time is never time alone, it always has an accompanying perception. And the changing perception of COVID-19, as we trudge our way through, has created a growing disconnect between what we know we need to do, and what we want to do. A disconnect that will define the timeline of COVID-19 for months to come.

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The Law of Unintended Consequences

Predictions, projections, and misleading conclusions seem to define COVID-19 policies. But as we continue to pursue solutions that can hopefully temper the pandemic, we need be aware of the law of unintended consequences – which may end up defining the lasting legacy of the government’s response to the pandemic.

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The Story of Pain

In the quantified world of healthcare, we continue to rely upon numbers and data to diagnose and treat patients. And we have applied a similar approach to our study of pain. But pain is fundamentally subjective, both logical and illogical, both rational and irrational. And to truly understand pain, we must study how pain has been perceived throughout history – and follow along the story of pain.

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A Framework to Understand Uncertainty in Healthcare

Today healthcare is seen as more a science than an art, but the progenitors of healthcare saw it as both a science and an art, in equal terms. The science of healthcare refines what we know, but the art of healthcare elucidates what we do not know. And what we do not know, what is uncertain, is far more impactful in healthcare than what we do know.

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When Science Speaks, Who Is The Speaker?

When science speaks, who is the speaker? Can science maintain the objectivity and credibility needed to impact patient behavior if it finds itself mired in the middle of political rhetoric?

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Quality In Healthcare – A Relationship, Not A Metric

In healthcare, we often conflate the validity of a process with the success of its outcome. And in today’s world of quality driven healthcare, conflating quality as an outcome instead of a process leads to a fundamental degradation of quality in healthcare. That is because quality is a relationship, not an individual behavior.

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A Patient Named Candide

A satirical tale inspired by the novella, Candide by the French philosopher Voltaire, reimagines Candide as a patient in today’s healthcare system.

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Fractals May Be The Missing Piece To COVID-19 Projections

Uncertainty and complexity have been the two most prominent features of COVID-19, confounding those who seek to understand and predict its behavior. But fractals, geometric patterns built upon infinitely complex mathematical models, can improve our current understanding of the dissemination patterns that define the behavior of COVID-19.

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Crime & Deterrence – The Constitutional Crisis of the Opioid Epidemic

As the opioid epidemic continues to affect lives across the country, law enforcement steps up their efforts to curtail the devastation. But they may have stepped too far and encroached upon the civil liberties of healthcare providers prompting a Constitutional crisis.

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Healthcare is a Game of Incomplete Dominance

Healthcare should be studied within the framework of the economic discipline, Game Theory, in which different perspectives or decisions have differing benefits to patients, but with no one perspective or decision being the absolute best.

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Healthcare Is Dialectic

Healthcare is defined by strongly held views that quickly develop and come into conflict with opposing views that form just as quickly. Recognizing how such interpretations form, and the underlying pattern of thought, may help to develop potential solutions.

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The BOP In The Age of Corona

A gritty tale of life inside a federal prison as inmates face and attempt to understand COVID-19 risks.

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Observer Bias Defines How We Look At Ourselves

Observer bias defines the reality we create and the narratives we tell, which may impact how we see the future.

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The Perception of COVID-19 Can Impact The Presidential Election

Perception can be greater than reality, but can the perception of COVID-19 impact the reality of the election results this coming November?

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Abortion Laws Are Fundamentally Unconstitutional

Abortion laws should be restructured to be less restrictive in nature and more affirmative – as per our founding father, James Madison.

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Imagination in Healthcare

Is imagination in healthcare important to you?

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A Moment of Duality

A medical short story inspired by the late, great WEB DuBois.

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How the Flu Pandemic Changed Halloween in 1918

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